Posts Tagged ‘retail’

New Study: 95% of Consumer Products are Greenwashing

Monday, December 6th, 2010

A new study that was recently released by TerraChoice states that 95% of consumer products claiming to be eco-friendly are committing at least one sin of greenwashing. The report highlighted the 7 sins of greenwashing– described as the act of misleading consumers about the environmental practices of a company or the environmental benefits of a product or service. The sin of “No proof” was the most persistent of all greenwashing sins in 2010.

TerraChoice examined 5,296 products for the study while visiting 19 retail stores in Canada and 15 in the US.

The news is not all bad though. Considering that 98% of consumer products were guilty of greenwashing in 2009, the number has decreased in 2010. Further, the number of green products on the market was up 73% this year from 2009.

It’s going to be very interesting to keep an eye on this study. With government regulations and consumers being more privy to the ‘green scene’, one would assume that the percentage will continue to decrease into the future!

The Future of Packaging, Part 2.

Monday, August 16th, 2010

In 2010, 27% of products at major US retailers are estimated to have sustainable packaging. By 2015, this figure is projected to reach 37%.

Despite a global recession, escalating environmental pressures from consumers, the media, and legislators have put pressure on manufacturers to emphasize innovation in design, choice of materials, processing, and life cycle logistics. In fact, green packaging is the only sector of packaging that has continued to show growth. This evidence tells us that the future of packaging is in sustainability.

Environmentally conscious decisions now must revolutionize packaging design and drive the bottom-line of companies. Consumers are becoming increasingly educated on what sustainability is to the extent that they can, and will, call out companies for greenwashing (deceptive use of green marketing in order to promote a misleading perception that a company’s policies or products are environmentally friendly).

Walmart continues to be on the forefront of sustainable packaging in the retail arena. Although the retail giant has achieved many of its environmental goals such as plastic bag reduction, it continues to be unable to eliminate PVC from private-label packaging. As sustainable packaging evolves, Walmart will continue to strive in achieving its PVC elimination goals.

Many other large companies are following suit including Proctor & Gamble. Very recently, they announced plans to use sugarcane-derived plastic on selected packaging for its Pantene Pro-V, Covergirl and Max Factor brands to increase its sustainability credentials. The strategy by P&G is completely consumer-driven. Their research shows that women around the world want to make themselves more beautiful without making their environment less beautiful.

Amazon and Mattel team up to implement their own green packaging innovation. Dubbing it Frustration Free Packaging (FFP), its intention is to stray away from plastic packaging that is difficult to open. Especially in regards to toy packaging, Mattel found that consumers were livid about the complexity of opening up toys from their plastic and twist-tie inundated mess. Frustration Free Packaging is recyclable and is designed to be opened without the use of a box cutter or knife and will protect your product just as well as traditional packaging.

The key to all of this is that consumer feedback from companies like these has been extremely positive. If customer’s are pleased and recognizing sustainable packaging efforts, the demand will continue to increase just as experts suspect that it will.

Eco-packaging of Note

Friday, June 25th, 2010

There’s no doubt green packaging is on the rise. It is being applied to retail products that are generally targeted to younger people- another sign that the phenomenon is spreading- because kids aren’t supposed to care right?

The design is extremely simple and neat. The headphones are wrapped around a single piece of cardboard without the use of any glues or plastic. Very clever and eco-friendly. Designed by Corinne Pant, a student at UQAM in Montreal.