Posts Tagged ‘plant based materials’

Geoengineering Experiment in the Pacific

Wednesday, October 17th, 2012

The Guardian, a British daily newspapers is reporting a large plankton boom in the Pacific Ocean of up to 10,000 square kilometers due to a large dump of 100 tons of iron sulfate off the coast of British   Columbia. This act was done as a part of a geo-engineering experiment to demonstrate that fertilization of the ocean can draw carbon from the atmosphere in order to combat climate change. This act was spearheaded by California business man  Russ George who was acting on the theory that iron stimulates the growth of phytoplankton, or algae. When the phytoplankton die and the organic material sinks into the ocean, the carbon of the organism goes with it where it can be held for centuries. Some have claimed that this effort violates two international resolutions made at the Convention on Biological Diversity and the London Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping Wastes and Other Matter. Although these claims were made, George still says that the efforts made to increase phytoplankton are not applicable to these resolutions.

 

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Coke Aspires for 100% Plant-based Bottle by 2020

Friday, December 30th, 2011

The Coca-Cola Co. just recently announced that they signed a multi-million dollar contract with three leading biotechnology companies in an effort to accelerate the developments of a 100% plant-based bottle. The partnership includes agreements with Virent, Gevo, and Avantium all combining their efforts to create the first commercial solution for next-generation PlantBottle™ packaging made 100% from plant-based materials. The partnership with the biotechnology could lead to practical results of a 100% plant-based PlantBottle available by 2017. Coca-Cola is expecting that all of its PET packaging will be replaced by the year 2020.

Coca-Cola’s current PlantBottle™, which was launched in 2009, is made from only 30% plant-based material. The remaining 70% of the bottle is made out of purified terephthalic acid (PTA), which Coca-Cola hopes to replace with plant-based materials. Since the current bottle was first introduced in 2009, Coca Cola states that they it has already distributed more than 10 billion PlantBottle™ packages in 20 different countries worldwide. Coca-Cola estimates that it has helped save the equivalent emissions of more than 100,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide.

According to Coca-Cola, agreements with these three companies (Virent, Gevo and Avantium) will help support the companies long-term commitments through sustainable practices in sourcing and in packaging supply.

“While the technology to make bio-based materials in a lab has been available for years, we believe Virent, Gevo and Avantium are companies that possess technologies that have high potential for creating them on a global commercial scale within the next few years,” said Rick Frazier, vice president of commercial product supply for The Coca-Cola Company. “This is a significant R&D investment in packaging innovation and is the next step toward our vision of creating all of our plastic packaging from responsibly sourced plant-based materials.”

As leaders in sustainable packaging, Coca-Cola also looks to innovate and advance opportunities to other companies throughout the industry and recently announced an industry first partnership with H.J. Heinz Company. This partnership will allow Heinz ketchup to use PlantBottle™ technology in its production.

Source: www.thecoca-colacompany.com/

Coca-Cola Releases New Plant Bottle

Monday, September 12th, 2011

Coca-Cola has made their vision clear of making all of their plastic bottles from plant-based materials and recycled plastic by 2020. Their latest development is rolling out new packaging for their 500ml drinks. The new PlantBottle packaging is made from 22.5% renewable plant-based PET and 25% recycled plastic. The reason these new bottles are more eco-frlendly is that they’ll reduce the company’s dependency on fossil fuels. They are being released today in the UK and can be identified with a PlantBottle logo. More than 5 billion of Coke’s PlantBottles will be available in 20 countries by the end of 2011.

Coca-Cola is not new to the green movement. In fact, last year they won the Best Sponsor Activation award at the UK Festival Awards for their recycling program. Coke is committed to recover the equivalent of 100% of their packaging by 2020.

PepsiCo: Recyclable and Compostable

Monday, May 30th, 2011

PepsiCo is at it once again to fulfill their overall environmental goal of becoming an eco-friendly company. PepsiCo has realized something very important, their beverages are not just packaged in cans and bottles, cups are another way that Pepsi products get distributed. Places like colleges, stadiums, theme parks, and eateries use cups to serve Pepsi beverages. Although cans are fully recyclable and they have created the Plant Bottle, PepsiCo now has another task to tackle.

So how did PepsiCo solve this problem? They realized the need for sustainable beverage packaging and used some innovation and creativity to create 5 different eco-friendly, compostable, and recyclable cups that they will issue to their U.S. food-service customers. They designed 100% recyclable clear plastic cups, compostable paper cups, and wax cups that are made from plant-based materials from sustainably managed forests.

PepsiCo has done a fantastic job at going green and meeting their sustainability goals. They work hard to come up with innovative ways to green their packaging. PepsiCo has taken initiative to realize that consumers want to be more eco-friendly and they want their packaging to be eco-friendly as well. They hope that other companies will realize this and come up with their own ways to be more sustainable companies and produce eco-friendly packaging.

Odwalla is Planting Eco-Friendliness

Monday, February 21st, 2011

Odwalla, maker of natural juices, smoothies, protein drinks, and food bars will be hitting shelves this March, but in a greener fashion. Odwalla will be transitioning from their traditional packaging to the PlantBottle. This new bottle is made of 100% plant-based materials and is 100% recyclable. It also consists of materials derived from molasses and sugarcane juice. The goal with this new Odwalla packaging is to reduce dependence on nonrenewable resources. Coca-Cola, along with many others have replaced their traditional packaging with the PlantBottle, in an effort to make their packaging more eco-friendly.

The PlantBottle is just another step Odwalla has taken to become a more sustainable company. They have created an organization called Plant a Tree Program, which has planted more than 300,000 trees in the last 3 years. They also developed Bloom Energy Fuel Cell technology which reduces Odwalla’s carbon footprint of its plant by 35%. The PlantBottle, along with their other green innovations are helping to reduce their dependence on nonrenewable resources.