Posts Tagged ‘packaging’

Education in Sustainability

Wednesday, May 29th, 2013

sustainable manufacturingThe American Institute of Chemical Engineers Institute for Sustainability offers specialized credentials for sustainability professionals as a response to the growing demand for specialized knowledge in sustainable industrial practice. The chair of the Institute and president of Sustainability Solutions LLC, Deb Grubbe, has noted that the credentialing effort has shaped a program built on existing curricula that includes real world case studies from companies. The body of knowledge that students will learn stems from the Institute’s Sustainability Index. The index focuses on seven areas that are critical to a sustainability effort. They are: strategic commitment, innovation, environmental performance, safety performance, product stewardship, social responsibility and value chain management.

Blog Source: Packaging Digest

Eco-Friendly Business Practices for Retail

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013

local manufacturingWhile consumers are more in tune with how their decisions affect the environment, it is only logical that retailers, manufacturers, and shippers strive toward the same goal. For any business to succeed in captivating an eco-conscious customer, they need to be fully aware of how their products and practices affect our world. One step that many retailers are missing is the use of eco-friendly materials in their products. Despite the green movement, many companies continue to rely on cheap, toxic and unsustainable materials for their products. Aside from materials, a company should also employ sustainable practices like choosing local suppliers or manufacturers. By choosing local suppliers, companies build a close community, invest in the local market, and reduce their carbon footprint. Shipping costs increase exponentially when using overseas suppliers, not to mention taking an important investment away from a local company that needs the business.

Blog Source: Greener Ideal

Limited Packaging

Wednesday, May 8th, 2013

green-packagingEco-friendly packaging characteristics like biodegradable, recycled, and reusable all strive toward the same goal of having the least affect on the environment. In reality, less is more. Next time you search for a “green” product, or environmentally safe packaging options for something you sell, keep limited packaging in mind. Sounds a little crazy coming from a packaging company, right? Well in all honesty, limited or no packaging is really the most environmentally friendly option there is. We are so concerned with the reusablity and recycled content in our packaging products, but if we didn’t use them in the first place we would need to justify using them again. Realistically, you are going to need some form of packaging to protect products in shipping, on the shelf, and even in your car on the way home- so eliminating packaging entirely isn’t necessarily an option. Instead, try to choose packaging that is more frugal with its resources. For example, buy products that are not individually wrapped, bring your own reusable bag to the store, even choose beverage bottles that use less plastic. Incorporating these habits in your shopping and business will save resources, cut costs, and save you the hassle of having to determine which products with “green” claims are really the best choice.

Look for Postconsumer

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

earth friendly post consumerPackaging is one of the biggest contributors to waste- up to one third of the nonindustrial waste in developed countries, according to the United States EPA. That is why packaging is a huge concern for consumers in retail. For the people that are interested in environmentally-friendly options here’s the issue: packaging is practically impossible to avoid altogether, so the goal of these consumers will always be to purchase products with packaging that does the least amount of damage. Not only is this good for our environment, but it is an added incentive for companies to strive for sustainable business practices. What we at Sunrise like to offer, and what the EPA recommends is to buy packaged products wrapped in material with a high percentage of recycled content. By doing this, consumers motivate companies to continue the cycle. SO- instead of simply grabbing for the product that makes general Eco-claims and call themselves green, search the labels for “recycled content” or “postconsumer content” and your sustainable efforts are a guarantee.

Blog Source: National Geographic

Eco-Friendly Wine Packaging

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

greenPicnicWebGilles Louvet, a vineyard located in the South of France, has announced the release (uncorking) of their new green PicNic organic wines in flexible stand up pouch. National Sales Manager Laura Bret explained that as the leader in organic wine production in France and Europe since 1993, it was only lgical for Gilles Louvet to take an interest in a more eco-friendly packaging solution such as this pouch. Like most wine drinkers, I assume that my wine come in a glass bottle. However, this flexible pouch is said to offer a carbon footprint with only 20% of traditional glass containers. The best part about this new packaging solution is that each 1.5 liter pouch holds the equivalent of two standard bottles of wine. Along with its benefits to the environment, the product offers a long eight week shelf-life, easy-to-open characteristics, and easy to pour.

Source: PackWorld

Consumers are on board with Green Products

Wednesday, April 10th, 2013

Green this, green that. As both the manufacturer and consumer all we hear about is providing eco-friendly alternatives for environmentally conscious consumers. But even as the trend is growing, it can still be a struggle for Americans to realize their role in the lifecycle of these products. When asked directly, 9 out of 10 believe it is their responsibility to properly use and dispose of green products. However, we have yet to see the results in action. Only 30% of Americans say that they often use the product in a way that achieves its intended environmental benefit. The majority of respondents in this survey expressed an interest in being educated in the proper way to use and dispose of eco-friendly products, but education isn’t the only barrier they face. One third of consumers admit to not having the resources, and one fifth just simply do not know how to find or use them. Consumers say they understand the environmental terms that companies use as being positive of neutral in terms of their effect on the environment. While the message is understood, many consumers feel overwhelmed by environmental messages because of their lack of education on the subject. Brands that promote environmental awareness already have their foot in the door and consumers on board. The next step is comprehensive environmental marketing, which is what we should expect to see in the future.

Fishing Plastic Waste from the Seas

Wednesday, March 13th, 2013

In seas around theUK, fisherman are being sent to collect waste plastic for recycling. The innovative project is supported by Ecover and Closed Loop Recycling. The waste being salvaged will go towards trials of a new type of plastic that uses rHDPE, plantastic, and the waste marine plastic that is collected. Both organizations involved are supporting the Waste Free Oceans initiative by sending an important anti-litter message to consumers to help in the efforts of reducing floating marine debris and highlighting the importance of recycling and the value of used plastic as a resource. Along with supporting these efforts, Ecover has launched it ‘Message in our Bottle’ campaign, along with the use of an entirely new form of fully sustainable and recyclable plastic made from 100% sugarcane and plastic fished from the sea- the use of this plastic will start in 2014.

Source: Packaging Digest

Extended Producer Responsibility

Wednesday, March 6th, 2013

Extended Producer Responsibility is gaining favor among environmentally conscious brands. For example, Recycling Reinvented recently announced that is has received a pledge of support from New Belgium Brewing Co. a brewery based inFort Collins,CO that produces over 25 varieties of craft beer. The director of sustainability for New Belgium states, “I believe that if the producers were held accountable for the end of life of their packages, more efficient and effective systems would be created to promote landfill diversion.” Going along with one of the company’s core values of “honoring nature at every turn of the business.” Through Extended Producer Responsibility, brand owners and manufacturers will help communities increase access to curbside recycling and recycling away from home for all product packaging. The program is pleased to have this pledge from New Belgium, and recognizes their long standing commitment to environmentally friendly production and packaging practices.

Source: Packaging Digest

Sustainable Packaging in the Spotlight

Wednesday, February 27th, 2013

Sustainable Packaging takes the stage as PBS’s In Focus educational program spotlights this growing industrial trend. In this program, Martin Sheen will look at the various ways that companies save money and help the environment by reducing the amount of packaging on their products. Companies that produce anything from electronics components to automobiles, companies are using less packaging material- especially for internal use. These cut companies’ costs and lead to less waste, meaning less garbage ending up in landfills where it will take years to decompose. This show will travel across the United States and profile different companies that have taken the steps to embrace sustainable packaging efforts.

Source: Packaging Digest

Possible Restrictions of Polystyrene Foam Products in NYC

Wednesday, February 20th, 2013

News reports have indicated that New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg is planning to propose restrictions on the use of polystyrene foam food service products. The end goal for this restriction is to increase recycling rates. In accordance with the Mayor, vice president of plastics at the American Chemistry Council (ACC), Steve Russell states, “We would welcome the opportunity to explore polystyrene foam food service recycling with the City. The technology exists to recycle polystyrene foam foodservice right now.” He goes on to explain howCaliforniais currently making this work with 22% of households in compliance. A lot of people mistakenly believe that these paper cups and plates are being recycled, but there is no commercial recycling of these products happening. Another misconception about paper product waste is that it is rapidly degrading in landfills compared to other products. While the properties of the items may allow for this, the landfills simply are not designed to comply to this process- they actually minimize the breakdown of waste by blocking out the air, water, and sunlight necessary to support the biological process. Implementing recycling efforts of these products may be sufficient to attain Bloomberg’s goal since the technology already exists, eliminating these products may not be the answer. As Russell states, “Polystyrene foam foodservice products make up less than one percent of our nation’s solid waste, according to EPA. They use significantly less energy and water to manufacture than paper alternatives and create significantly less waste by weight and comparable waste by volume.”

For more information about polystyrene foam food service products, visit: http://www.plasticfoodservicefacts.com/

Blog source: Packaging Digest