Posts Tagged ‘consumers’

APR Opposes Degradable Additives

Wednesday, April 24th, 2013

recyclable plasticsThe trade association of companies that recycle plastic, also known as The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers, opposes the use of degradable additives in currently recyclable bottles, containers, and films. There are serious implications of using said additives on the recyclability of packaging. While it may seem understandable to use an additive that will help the plastic degrade, the concern is the impact of this additive when used in successive applications. Most secondary uses of recycled plastics are intended for long term uses such as carpeting, plastic lumber, and pipe. Such items have an expected life span of 30 years or more, however if the plastics being recycled to make the product have this degradable additive, the polymer molecules will start to break down, vastly decreasing the product’s life span that consumers depend on. The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR) is in support of legislation that would require containers with degradable additives to be labeled with the instruction “do not recycle”. The APR have looked for instances and proof of no harm done from the providers of this additive, and do not have the evidence to change their opposition.

Read more at Packworld

Consumers are on board with Green Products

Wednesday, April 10th, 2013

Green this, green that. As both the manufacturer and consumer all we hear about is providing eco-friendly alternatives for environmentally conscious consumers. But even as the trend is growing, it can still be a struggle for Americans to realize their role in the lifecycle of these products. When asked directly, 9 out of 10 believe it is their responsibility to properly use and dispose of green products. However, we have yet to see the results in action. Only 30% of Americans say that they often use the product in a way that achieves its intended environmental benefit. The majority of respondents in this survey expressed an interest in being educated in the proper way to use and dispose of eco-friendly products, but education isn’t the only barrier they face. One third of consumers admit to not having the resources, and one fifth just simply do not know how to find or use them. Consumers say they understand the environmental terms that companies use as being positive of neutral in terms of their effect on the environment. While the message is understood, many consumers feel overwhelmed by environmental messages because of their lack of education on the subject. Brands that promote environmental awareness already have their foot in the door and consumers on board. The next step is comprehensive environmental marketing, which is what we should expect to see in the future.

Sustainable Packaging in the Spotlight

Wednesday, February 27th, 2013

Sustainable Packaging takes the stage as PBS’s In Focus educational program spotlights this growing industrial trend. In this program, Martin Sheen will look at the various ways that companies save money and help the environment by reducing the amount of packaging on their products. Companies that produce anything from electronics components to automobiles, companies are using less packaging material- especially for internal use. These cut companies’ costs and lead to less waste, meaning less garbage ending up in landfills where it will take years to decompose. This show will travel across the United States and profile different companies that have taken the steps to embrace sustainable packaging efforts.

Source: Packaging Digest

A Great Way to Reuse!

Wednesday, November 28th, 2012

It seems as if printed/developed pictures are becoming a thing of the past. However, there will always be a demand for nicely printed and framed pictures in our homes and workplaces. A young couple from Virginia posted in their blog/website a unique way to have nicely framed pictures by using their used jewel CD cases. They express that ever since they started using the increasingly popular photography tool, Instagram, they have wanted to find a fun way to showcase their family photos. They realized after ordering the printouts of their photos, with a small trim these photos fit snugly into the front of a jewel case. Not only does this solution protect photos as they hang, but should a problem arise these easy-to-come-by picture frames cost less than a dollar to replace. Not only is this an economically friendly craft to spruce up your home, but it is a great way to re-use a product that would inevitably sit in a landfill otherwise.

 

Read more about Young House Love

“Green Guides” Revised

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued final revisions to “Green Guides”. These guides are set in place to ensure that claims made by companies and marketers promoting “green” or eco-friendly products live up to a set standard.

The revisions to the FTC’s guides are not invented by the organization. They reflect a wide range of public input, taking into consideration consumer and industry comments on previous drafts. The “Green Guides” include revisions to previous versions as well as new additions and developments.

The goal of updating these standards is to ensure that the environmentally conscious consumer is getting what they paid for and to level the playing field for businesses that are honest in their eco-friendly claims. The update also modified categories of recent developments in “green” manufacturing. Some of the new sections include; certifications and approvals, non-toxic claims, renewable claims, and free-of claims. In return, the consumer should see a more honest representation of products that are truly considered “green”.

 

Read more at packagingdigest

Recycling Made Easier

Monday, June 13th, 2011


The Sustainable Packaging Coalition (SPC) is an industry working group that is committed to creating and implementing an environmental vision for packaging. Their mission is to advocate and communicate a robust vision for making packaging more environmentally friendly. They also support innovative and functional packaging materials that promote economic and environmental health. SPC has been working on a new project and they are preparing to launch a voluntary labeling pilot program for packaging this fall that intends to increase recycling and make it easier to understand. The hope is to eliminate confusion that is caused by some labels. SPC will allow members to use this new labeling program on their products, and plan on opening the program to others. The overall goal of this program is for it to become a universal label.

Eco labeling has taken some heat recently because it can be confusing and misleading. Some companies that participate in greenwashing use eco labels to make their products appear to be eco-friendly. This has led to consumer confusion and frustration. Consumers want instruction and direction on what is actually recyclable. This pilot labeling program will help give consumers the right information on what to recycle, with the goal of keeping everyone on the same page.

The labels have three classifications: widely recycled, not recyclable, and limited recycling. A black diagonal line will classify the not recyclable label. Limited recycling will have the phrase check locally above the icon and it will identify the material. Plastic bags and films will be classified by store drop off or recycle if clean and dry.

Green Consumerism

Monday, May 23rd, 2011

Consumerism is a movement that seeks to protect and inform consumers by requiring practices like packaging, advertising, product guarantees, and safety standards. In theory it is also the outcome of producing greater consumption of goods for the benefit of the economy. Since we have become a society that is concerned with the state of our environment, consumerism has become eco-friendly. Green consumerism is a new movement that is concerned about products and services that are considered ethically made. This means with minimal harm to or exploitation of humans, animals, and/or the natural environment.

Green consumerism is interesting in that it focuses on us buying green products. Well how beneficial are green products to the environment if we don’t use them properly. An article written by Jacquie Ottman titled “The Next Frontier in Green Marketing is Responsible Consumption” pinpoints this issue spot on. The article provides an example: how is an eco-friendly light bulb eco-friendly if the light remains on after everyone leaves the room? They contradict each other. We may feel good about doing our part if we buy green products, but we need to focus more on the behaviors we conduct when we use them. It defeats the purpose of buying green if we are not using the products in an eco-friendly manner.

Going green is based on behavior. If we want to be buy eco-friendly products we must learn green behaviors. If we look at this issue from a business perspective, marketers of green products should focus on adding value for consumers and providing them with the needed knowledge of how to use the product. Buying green products and using them properly is how we will help save our planet. Green consumerism is on the rise and more consumers feel they have a personal responsibility to do their part to help the earth.

The Future of Packaging, Part 2.

Monday, August 16th, 2010

In 2010, 27% of products at major US retailers are estimated to have sustainable packaging. By 2015, this figure is projected to reach 37%.

Despite a global recession, escalating environmental pressures from consumers, the media, and legislators have put pressure on manufacturers to emphasize innovation in design, choice of materials, processing, and life cycle logistics. In fact, green packaging is the only sector of packaging that has continued to show growth. This evidence tells us that the future of packaging is in sustainability.

Environmentally conscious decisions now must revolutionize packaging design and drive the bottom-line of companies. Consumers are becoming increasingly educated on what sustainability is to the extent that they can, and will, call out companies for greenwashing (deceptive use of green marketing in order to promote a misleading perception that a company’s policies or products are environmentally friendly).

Walmart continues to be on the forefront of sustainable packaging in the retail arena. Although the retail giant has achieved many of its environmental goals such as plastic bag reduction, it continues to be unable to eliminate PVC from private-label packaging. As sustainable packaging evolves, Walmart will continue to strive in achieving its PVC elimination goals.

Many other large companies are following suit including Proctor & Gamble. Very recently, they announced plans to use sugarcane-derived plastic on selected packaging for its Pantene Pro-V, Covergirl and Max Factor brands to increase its sustainability credentials. The strategy by P&G is completely consumer-driven. Their research shows that women around the world want to make themselves more beautiful without making their environment less beautiful.

Amazon and Mattel team up to implement their own green packaging innovation. Dubbing it Frustration Free Packaging (FFP), its intention is to stray away from plastic packaging that is difficult to open. Especially in regards to toy packaging, Mattel found that consumers were livid about the complexity of opening up toys from their plastic and twist-tie inundated mess. Frustration Free Packaging is recyclable and is designed to be opened without the use of a box cutter or knife and will protect your product just as well as traditional packaging.

The key to all of this is that consumer feedback from companies like these has been extremely positive. If customer’s are pleased and recognizing sustainable packaging efforts, the demand will continue to increase just as experts suspect that it will.