Archive for April, 2013

APR Opposes Degradable Additives

Wednesday, April 24th, 2013

recyclable plasticsThe trade association of companies that recycle plastic, also known as The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers, opposes the use of degradable additives in currently recyclable bottles, containers, and films. There are serious implications of using said additives on the recyclability of packaging. While it may seem understandable to use an additive that will help the plastic degrade, the concern is the impact of this additive when used in successive applications. Most secondary uses of recycled plastics are intended for long term uses such as carpeting, plastic lumber, and pipe. Such items have an expected life span of 30 years or more, however if the plastics being recycled to make the product have this degradable additive, the polymer molecules will start to break down, vastly decreasing the product’s life span that consumers depend on. The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR) is in support of legislation that would require containers with degradable additives to be labeled with the instruction “do not recycle”. The APR have looked for instances and proof of no harm done from the providers of this additive, and do not have the evidence to change their opposition.

Read more at Packworld

Eco-Friendly Wine Packaging

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

greenPicnicWebGilles Louvet, a vineyard located in the South of France, has announced the release (uncorking) of their new green PicNic organic wines in flexible stand up pouch. National Sales Manager Laura Bret explained that as the leader in organic wine production in France and Europe since 1993, it was only lgical for Gilles Louvet to take an interest in a more eco-friendly packaging solution such as this pouch. Like most wine drinkers, I assume that my wine come in a glass bottle. However, this flexible pouch is said to offer a carbon footprint with only 20% of traditional glass containers. The best part about this new packaging solution is that each 1.5 liter pouch holds the equivalent of two standard bottles of wine. Along with its benefits to the environment, the product offers a long eight week shelf-life, easy-to-open characteristics, and easy to pour.

Source: PackWorld

Consumers are on board with Green Products

Wednesday, April 10th, 2013

Green this, green that. As both the manufacturer and consumer all we hear about is providing eco-friendly alternatives for environmentally conscious consumers. But even as the trend is growing, it can still be a struggle for Americans to realize their role in the lifecycle of these products. When asked directly, 9 out of 10 believe it is their responsibility to properly use and dispose of green products. However, we have yet to see the results in action. Only 30% of Americans say that they often use the product in a way that achieves its intended environmental benefit. The majority of respondents in this survey expressed an interest in being educated in the proper way to use and dispose of eco-friendly products, but education isn’t the only barrier they face. One third of consumers admit to not having the resources, and one fifth just simply do not know how to find or use them. Consumers say they understand the environmental terms that companies use as being positive of neutral in terms of their effect on the environment. While the message is understood, many consumers feel overwhelmed by environmental messages because of their lack of education on the subject. Brands that promote environmental awareness already have their foot in the door and consumers on board. The next step is comprehensive environmental marketing, which is what we should expect to see in the future.

New Packaging Provides Reuse Ideas

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013

reusable boxPractically all products come with packaging that is reusable in some way. The problem is, not everyone is born with the creative instinct to know how to use it all (certainly not me). A great idea that comes from Costa Rica aims to provide creative ideas for packaging reuse for the creatively inept, therefore increasing and promoting clever re utilization of product packaging. The website, quehagoconesto.org(Spanish for “what do I do with this?”) is a successful project coming from Central America that has gotten several brands to incorporate reuse instructions in their labeling. The organization made an agreement with the Universidad Veritas in Costa Rica to introduce this project into their design curriculum. The product labels for these items direct consumers to the website for step-by-step instructions and pictures on how to reuse their packaging. Re utilization concepts can also be uploaded by anyone- a community reuse blog of sorts. The goal of this project is to make a large impact with such a small change. With the simple addition of a Quehagoconesto label, companies are given the opportunity to contribute to the post-consumer cycle.

Source: treehugger.com